Matthew Marcarian

Principal

B Com, CA, CTA, M Tax, ATA, TEP, JP

Matthew is a Chartered Accountant and Chartered Tax Adviser specialising in international tax and accounting. He is dual qualified in Australia and Singapore. His clients rely on him to deliver the right advice for complex personal circumstances.

As the head of CST’s Sydney practice and director of CST International, Matthew has extensive expertise in international tax issues for individuals, family groups and international enterprises in various industries including technology, professional services and commodities and consumer brands.

His principal areas of tax expertise include residency, family trusts, capital gains tax, controlled foreign companies and foreign trusts, FATCA and the Common Reporting Standard. Matthew is a market entry specialist for Australian firms moving to the United States and Asia.

As a consequence of this previous role as the head of CST’s Singapore practice, Matthew regularly travels to Asia where he assists a range of clients in relation to diverse tax and accounting issues.

Matthew has had professional works published in leading taxation industry journals including Taxation in Australia and the Tax Specialist. He regularly presents at industry seminars.

Matthew obtained the degree of Master of Taxation at the Australian School of Taxation (ATAX) at the University of New South Wales, where he was awarded the Allens Arthur Robinson Prize for the best performance by a graduating student. He hold a Bachelor Degree in Commerce from Macquarie University where he graduated with an award of meritorious academic excellence.

In Australia Matthew is a Chartered Tax Advisor, Chartered Accountant and Registered Tax Agent. He is also a member of the Sydney chapter of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners. In Singapore, Matthew is a Chartered Accountant and Accredited Tax Advisor having been admitted to membership of both the Singapore Institute of Chartered Accountants and the Singapore Institute of Accredited Tax Advisors.